Different Strokes for Different Folks

I read a post from a fellow diabetic this morning and after possibly breaking her site with a lengthy comment, I though why not continue it here on my own blog.  A polite way of describing the people I want to talk about are back seat diabetics or armchair diabetics. These are people who either are not diabetic and think they know what is best for us/me or they are diabetic and think their solution is the absolute cure to this disease so everyone needs to follow their advice.

Molly, at huggingthecactus.com (hope I got that right Molly), was talking about a recent experience she had while out to eat and her sugar dropped. Been there, done that. I loved her approach. It mirrored mine so much, great minds think alike. She used common easily obtainable items to prevent a low.

I have been for years told by my, now former, endocrinologist that I should carry a glucotab bottle or get some of the paste to keep with me for any lows I get. I just laugh. I had tried that years ago and found it very not my style. One, they taste terrible. They are very strong sugar substances that use sour flavors to try and conceal the very sweet  taste. Yes, I used the term TRY. It does not work in my opinion. Second is the low sugar content of each pill/tablet. Each one when I bought them was about 3 grams of sugar and 3 grams of carbs. Duh, sugar is a carb. I would down the entire 10 tabs and still have to get candy from a machine to get back to normal. 30 grams plus to get back to normal.

I currently, like Molly did, use regular soda to boost my sugar level when it gets low. A Mountain Dew has 46 grams of carbs in a 12 oz can. Some days it only stalls my drops instead of reverse it and then at other times it will send me into low earth orbit, well at least my blood sugar.

My point here is there are no two identical people on this planet. Even identical twins are not doing the exact same things at the exact same times hence what may work for one would not work the other. There are about 8 billion people on this planet so even if they all were diabetic, thank God they are not, there would be 8 billion different treatments for lows. Every person is different so every person must find their own fix to each incident. Let’s be honest about it, the same fix does work every time even with the same person. Just go back and re-read the last paragraph.

Molly talked about working out earlier, before her incident, and that brings up another issue, exercise. Everyone reacts differently to it and does it in different amounts and intensities. Please do not tell me I’m correcting it wrong simply because I’m not following my “prescribed” treatment to the letter. I have had 40 plus years learning my body and how it responds to my environment. I can probably tell you what will drop my sugar level or raise it and how fast before I even touch a food or weight.

I tried an insulin pump (twice), one that was supposed to be fully automatic. That means it decided how much basal insulin it was going to give me with no input from me such as having to set a specific basal rate at a specific time. It would read my sugar level and make the changes on the fly. It works great for a lot of people but not for me. My diagnosis as a type 1 diabetic was called into question because of the settings we were using and the way I reacted to it. The results are yes, I am most definitely a type 1 diabetic. You know what the kicker was for getting a C-peptide test (a test of whether your body makes any or enough insulin of its own)? When I was going to start the pump I ran out of Toujeo insulin (basal) and the insurance company did not authorize a refill. I don’t blame them. They just paid for an $11,000 pump. I ended up going for 3 almost 4 weeks without my basal insulin. I can hear the gasps out there. Relax. You really could not tell I wasn’t on any. Sugar level were higher at times but not nearly as high as they should have been.

The pump suspended my insulin for nearly 4 hours (insulin half live was 5 hours) at times and I still had to eat to get it back up. Here’s a trick if you have enough will power, Skittles are like little sugar pills (they taste far better though). First, don’t swallow them as soon as you get them in your mouth. Chew on them until they just don’t seem as sweet. My opinion was it got the sugar into my system much faster. Second don’t eat the whole bag. A small bag from the vending machine has 56 grams of carbs in it. I just did about 3 to 4 of them at a time to slowly get it back up, unless it was crashing hard. They are very easy to scale to my need at the time. That whole bag is like a meal in a bag when referring to the carb count.

Like I started out saying, everyone is different and what work for one person may not work for another. I do listen to others for advice but please don’t expect me to blindly follow your example. I may use part of it or none of it. I listen learn and adapt it to my needs and wants. You should to. I will willingly tell you what I do, have done, or would do but you need to see what if anything actually works for you. I don’t think most people could get by eating 3,400 calories a day without gaining weight. I’ve eaten like this for at least 20 years and not gained (or sadly lost) any more than 5 or 10 pounds in that time.

While I was on the pump the doctor kept telling me I was eating to many carbs. I needed to cut back on them and eat more protein and fats. Hey I’d do it if I wasn’t already cramming cars to stop lows. That 150 gram “magic” carb count number is based off a 1200 or 1500 calorie diet. So at 3400 calories if you do the math, I should be up to about 310 or 320 depending on which base number you use. When I started the pump I was at about 420 carbs a day and had dropped it to about 280 to 290 a day by the end so I actually did cut them down. Using the original numbers, I was under the carb count persentage. She didn’t see it that way. It’s one the reasons I decided to leave her and go another route.

Here’s the basics of this speech. Don’t feel you have to follow the path of another find diabetic bliss. Make your own path, it is the only one YOU can follow. Listen to others who are experienced, be it more or less, with this disease. They may give you an answer or least a clue to help you find your path, just don’t feel obligated to dot the i’s and cross the t’s. Doctor or no doctor, you decide what does or does not work for you. They can look at your Dexcom or Medtronic sensor log but they are seeing only part of the story. You have lived it. Like I said listen but be realistic about how and if it will work. I argued with my former endo about said reading and won the argument, well at least I got her to agree to me trying my idea. A good doctor will listen to their patients as much as the patients should listen to the doctor. Tell them your fears and goals. Tell them why your sugar shot up because 2 hours earlier on that same graph your sugar was at 80 and falling fast. You over corrected. Look for patterns on the graphs. Again you know if you were working hard or chilling in front of the TV. It can affect that graph just as much as what you eat. Blaze your own path in this world, just be smart about it.

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